The 4 most interesting kinds of House primaries in 2022

The 4 most interesting kinds of House primaries in 2022

This post was originally published on this siteFewer competitive House districts means that some of 2022’s most consequential congressional elections are happening well before November. The real action in many districts is this spring and summer as Republican and Democratic candidates jockey for their parties’ nominations.

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Campaign season kicks off in earnest with primaries in 14 states in May

Campaign season kicks off in earnest with primaries in 14 states in May

This post was originally published on this site This month’s primaries and runoffs will serve as a test of the power of former President Trump’s endorsements up and down the ballot. (Image credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

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Kemp and Perdue clash over 2020 election results at Georgia GOP governor’s debate

Kemp and Perdue clash over 2020 election results at Georgia GOP governor’s debate

This post was originally published on this siteGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp and former Sen. David Perdue clashed over the results of the 2020 election during the state’s GOP governor’s debate Sunday night, blaming each other for Democratic gains in the last election cycle.

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Dem super PAC pays $3.5 million for pro-Biden ads in swing states

Dem super PAC pays $3.5 million for pro-Biden ads in swing states

Democratic super PAC American Bridge 21st Century is pouring another $3.5 million into pro-Biden ads in Pennsylvania, Arizona, Georgia, and Nevada to bolster his image ahead of the 2022 midterms, Politico reported Wednesday.
In the past month, the super PAC spent $5 million on ads in the same four battleground states. Per Politico, American Bridge expects to spend more than $10 million on ads by November.
During the 2020 election cycle, the super PAC specialized in attack ads, shelling out over $50 million to unseat former President Donald Trump and over $8 million targeting former Georgia Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, compared to only $40,000 on ads touting now-President Biden.
For 2022, though, it’s all hands on deck to bolster Biden, whose approval rating hit an all-time low of 33 percent last week, according to a Quinnipiac poll. Biden might not be on the ballot, but that won’t stop his unpopularity from dragging down his fellow Democrats.
In Arizona, American Bridge is airing an ad in which a retiree says that she hasn’t “always voted Democrat,” but that Biden “reflects my values” and is “doing what he can” to bring down the cost of living. “There’s more work to be done, but Joe Biden gets it,” the woman says.

In another ad, set to air in Pennsylvania, a Meadville resident and former Republican says Biden “wants progress” and is “focused on access to better jobs and lowering costs.”

According to one study, the average American household is spending an additional $327 per month due to the highest inflation in 40 years, which has emerged as a top issue among voters.

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The most interesting Republican primaries of 2022

The most interesting Republican primaries of 2022

This post was originally published on this siteFrom Pennsylvania to Ohio, Trump has staked his reputation on endorsing controversial candidates — and that could determine which party controls the Senate next year.

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Georgia Gov. Kemp to sign bill allowing concealed carry of handguns without a license

Georgia Gov. Kemp to sign bill allowing concealed carry of handguns without a license

This post was originally published on this site ATLANTA — As of Tuesday, most Georgians will be allowed to carry concealed handguns without first getting a license from the state. Making good on a 2018 campaign promise, Gov. Brian Kemp is expected to sign Senate Bill 319, sometimes referred to...

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The top 10 Senate races that are most likely to flip to the other party

The top 10 Senate races that are most likely to flip to the other party

This post was originally published on this siteThough more Republican-held seats are up for grabs in November, Democratic struggles mean the GOP has improved its likelihood to take control of the Senate. Here are the key contests to watch. (Image credit: Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images; Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; STR/NurPhoto/Getty...

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Russia orders 135,000 new military conscripts, reportedly pulls troops from Georgia to Ukraine

Russia orders 135,000 new military conscripts, reportedly pulls troops from Georgia to Ukraine

Russia is redeploying 1,200 to 2,000 troops from Russian-occupied Georgia and reorganizing them into three tactical battle groups “to reinforce its invasion of Ukraine,” Britain’s Ministry of Defense said Thursday evening, its latest intelligence update. “It is highly unlikely that Russia planned to generate reinforcements in this manner and it is indicative of the unexpected losses it has sustained during the invasion.” 
Russia has stationed its forces in parts of the former Soviet republic since invading it in 2008.
Russian President Vladimir Putin earlier Thursday signed a decree ordering that 134,500 Russian men age 18 to 27 be conscripted into the Russian army as part of its annual spring draft, but Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu suggested none of them will be sent to Ukraine. “Most military personnel will undergo professional training in training centers for three to five months,” he said in remarks published Tuesday. “Let me emphasize that recruits will not be sent to any hot spots.”
Mikhail Benyash, a lawyer representing Russian National Guard members who refused orders to go to Ukraine, told Reuters that under Russian law, these conscripts could actually be sent to fight after several months of training. 
The issue of sending conscripts to war is politically fraught in Russia. Putin claimed in the beginning of March that no conscripts were “participating in hostilities” in Ukraine, but the Defense Ministry said that in fact there were conscripts in Ukraine and some had been taken prisoner by Ukraine, prompting Putin to order military prosecutors to find and charge the officials who had deployed the conscripts against purported orders. 
“The Russians need more soldiers,” since “their invasion plan with over 55 percent of Russian ground forces has placed them in a very difficult spot,” retired Australian Army Maj. Gen. Mick Ryan tweeted Thursday. But even if Putin does intend to deploy the conscripts, that “will be of little assistance. It takes time to train soldiers.”
Western intelligence assesses that at least 1,000 private soldiers from the Wagner Group have already been deployed in eastern Ukraine, but Ryan said none of this will save Russia from its early miscalculations. “They will obviously use mercenaries, and second- or third-rate forces from elsewhere (such as Georgia). We should not expect their military effectiveness to be any better than the ‘theoretically elite’ formations which crossed into Ukraine on 24 February.”

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Battle for Georgia 2022: Trump’s contentiousness looms large as candidates prepare to rumble

Battle for Georgia 2022: Trump’s contentiousness looms large as candidates prepare to rumble

This post was originally published on this site Hundreds of candidates just cut a check and filed paperwork to be on the ballot in Georgia this year. Six of them are touting the endorsement of former President Donald Trump, whose fixation with Georgia has driven a wedge within the GOP...

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