Trucker protest organizer pledges to ‘escalate’ convoy around DC

Trucker protest organizer pledges to ‘escalate’ convoy around DC

This post was originally published on this site The “organizer” of the disorganized convoy of big rigs, pickup trucks, SUVs and sedans protesting non-existent federal COVID-19 mask and vaccine mandates says the group plans to escalate its protest around the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. on Monday by taking up...

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A Truck Caravan With Far-Right Links Heads to Washington, D.C.

A Truck Caravan With Far-Right Links Heads to Washington, D.C.

This post was originally published on this siteMany backers of the caravan, planned as an American version of last month’s chaotic Canadian protest, have connections to the violent attack on the Capitol in January 2021.

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How Canada’s Freedom Convoy could be a wake-up call for the Teamsters

How Canada’s Freedom Convoy could be a wake-up call for the Teamsters

This week, a “People’s Convoy” of truckers aggrieved by COVID-19 restrictions and vaccine mandates will descend upon the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area with a goal of blockading economic activity in the nation’s capital. The American convoy models itself off similar trucker demonstrations in Ottawa, which were able to temporarily shut down over a quarter of the daily trade between the U.S. and Canada. 
One protest organizer, Bob Bolus, told D.C.’s Fox 5 News that he analogizes the goal of the Washington convoy to “a giant boa constrictor that basically squeezes you, chokes you, and … swallows you, and that’s what we’re going to do the D.C. [region].” Residents of the area are understandably nervous about another large group of conservative protesters coming in from out of town with the goal of shutting things down.
There is, however, another group that might be watching the D.C. convoy closely: the union representing 1.4 million truck drivers and other logistics workers, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.
The Teamsters have come out strongly against the convoys, calling them a “disruption” and a threat to the livelihood of working Americans. But within the union, many are hoping truckers will soon cause more disruption. Sasha, a UPS Teamster working out of Oakland, California, recently had her pay cut by almost 25 percent under a contract loophole that permits the company to roll back higher wages that were offered to new part-time hires during the pandemic. She recalled to The Week a conversation with one of her coworkers who is raising a child and told her that he had been proud to be a UPS worker, but that with the pay cut the choice for him was either “to quit, or to fight.” Sasha has told her friends, only partially in jest, that they should expect Christmas to be canceled in 2023 if the company doesn’t meet their demands — and she relayed that the workers she knows are “excited about the prospect of more militant action,” especially since the pay cuts.
The Teamsters are the largest private-sector union in the United States. With the retirement of General President Jimmy Hoffa — son of the more famous late president of the same name — the union has elected Sean O’Brien at the head of an uneasy coalition between longstanding Hoffa critics (including the reform-minded Teamsters for a Democratic Union, of which Sasha is a member) and recent defectors from Hoffa’s faction, many of whom were angered by a 2018 decision by the previous leadership to impose a contract on 250,000 UPS workers despite a majority voting against ratification. The candidate backed by Hoffa, Steve Vairma, received just one-third of the vote in last year’s election, while O’Brien, who defected from Hoffa’s faction over his opposition to the UPS contract move, received two-thirds. O’Brien will take office next month. 
While Teamster politics have long been contentious and there are multiple reasons for the shift in leadership, O’Brien and his coalition tapped into a sentiment that the union needs to be more aggressive in bargaining and willing to support strikes. The new leader’s agenda includes a promise to involve rank-and-file members on bargaining teams and, crucially, to pay out strike benefits beginning on day one, reversing a policy that had workers go without pay for over a week before the union’s strike fund provided them with relief — a policy that O’Brien and allies argue undermines the threat of strikes as bargaining leverage. 
The UPS contract expires in 2023, giving the union an opportunity for a do-over on issues such as two-tier pay structures, forced overtime, and harassment by supervisors at a company that increased its operating profits by over 50 percent in 2021. The big question for workers and their union is, how far are they willing to go to end these practices and win better pay and conditions? 
The new leadership, elected on pledges to drive a harder bargain and to prepare the union for a strike if necessary, could simply do these things with the intention of achieving a better deal at the last minute, averting a strike. The IATSE union, representing film and television production staff, used this tactic to win concessions from studios, authorizing a strike with 98 percent voting in favor at a 90 percent turnout, then cutting a controversial deal passed only by slim majorities within the union.
However, this is not the only option. Teamsters might like their chances in a strike against UPS, especially as memories will be fresh from the disruptions caused by trucker convoys, organized without strike pay or legal protection from a pro-union National Labor Relations Board. Workers would likely have political support from the Biden administration, and the sky-high profits reported by UPS may work against the company due to the sentiment that they can afford to give workers a better deal. Sasha, the California Teamster, says that this is “common sense” with her community when she talks about the issues and notes Americans supported the last UPS strike in 1997, which won part-time workers like her healthcare benefits, among other victories. 
The trucker convoy protests have little to do with traditional labor issues, and lots of Teamsters view them with disdain; many of those participating in the protests are nonunion owner-operators. The Ottawa convoy’s target is not the boss, but an elected federal government with an incentive to project strength by rejecting demands of a group that are damaging the economy. The disruption caused by the trucker protests was not sufficient to force the Canadian government into serious concessions, and they’re even less likely to do so in D.C. 
The Teamsters facing off against UPS, on the other hand, have better odds. The union is unlikely to officially support blockades due to potential liability, but legal mass pickets and community campaigns are likely, and it is possible to imagine some truckers (indeed, possibly some of the same truckers — there are, Sasha notes, labor unionists of all races, genders, and political orientations) taking matters into their own hands and shutting down access to major shipping corridors. With the union withdrawing its labor, militant disruptions, and public sympathy, the company could be forced into major concessions. 
Anyone hoping that the trucker convoys will turn into a durable expression of working-class power is deluding themselves, whether they be naive leftists who see a revolution around every corner, or conservative populists offering ludicrous pronouncements about the Republican Party being a “workers’ party.” But history sometimes takes strange courses, and it is possible to imagine that this display of economic disruption by anti-mandate truckers in Canada and the United States could be remembered as a wake-up call for labor. 

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US trucker convoys prompt National Guard deployment in Washington

US trucker convoys prompt National Guard deployment in Washington

This post was originally published on this siteHundreds of unarmed troops will man traffic posts from Saturday ahead of the convoys’ arrival.

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Canadian police regain control of downtown Ottawa

Canadian police regain control of downtown Ottawa

Canadian police fenced off parts of downtown Ottawa on Sunday to reestablish control of the capital city after a weekend crackdown ended the so-called Freedom Convoy protest against COVID-19 restrictions. Officers made 191 arrests and towed nearly 80 vehicles. Truckers started the demonstration more than three weeks ago, blocking city streets with parked trucks to protest a vaccine mandate on cross-border truck drivers.The demonstration grew as others came to express opposition to other coronavirus restrictions. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last week invoked emergency powers to give the government authority to shut down the protest. Police said they had gathered intelligence on departing protesters “to make sure that these illegal activities don’t return to our streets.”

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Arrests, truck towing begin in Ottawa as police clamp down on protests

Arrests, truck towing begin in Ottawa as police clamp down on protests

Police moved in to arrest Canadian protesters in downtown Ottawa Friday morning, with the goal of ending weekslong demonstrations that have transformed into a referendum on the country’s COVID-19 restrictions and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s handling of the pandemic, The Associated Press reports.
Hundreds of officers began handcuffing protesters and towing away vehicles as truckers “blared their horns in defiance,” AP writes. Though some on the streets surrendered, other invidiuals “remained defiant as the crackdown on the self-styled Freedom Convoy unfolded.”
The Ottawa Police have thus far reportedly accounted for 15 arrests, and have “created a perimeter with about 100 checkpoints in Ottawa’s downtown core, to keep anyone but residents from entering,” writes The New York Times. Canada’s capital city has become the “last stronghold” in the truckers’ political demonstration, AP notes.
Authorities, who have until now “hesitated to move against many of the protesters,” writes AP, arrested two of the convoy’s main organizers — Tamara Lich and Chris Barber — late Thursday. Also this week, Trudeau declared a national public order emergency, “the first such declaration in half a century,” in a bid to end the chaos, notes the Times.

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‘Like a military operation’: ‘Ghost’ Maryland Proud Boy leads a trucker convoy support group

‘Like a military operation’: ‘Ghost’ Maryland Proud Boy leads a trucker convoy support group

This post was originally published on this site The state lead for a Telegram group organizing support for the upcoming trucker convoy to Washington DC is a member of the Maryland DC Proud Boys chapter, Raw Story has confirmed. “We’ve been tasked with collecting supplies, having people ready for the...

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‘Freedom Convoy’ donations are about half Canadian, half from U.S., leaked data show

‘Freedom Convoy’ donations are about half Canadian, half from U.S., leaked data show

As Canadian law enforcement dismantles “Freedom Convoy” protests blocking U.S.-Canada border crossings, the effective blockade of the capital, Ottawa, shows no signs of breaking up. Ottawa Police Services chief Peter Sloly stepped down Tuesday amid criticism of his tepid, ineffective response to the entrenched, disciplined, and logistically sophisticated occupation. As news of Sloly’s departure reached the central protest encampment, “jubilant honking blared through the city,” The New York Times reports.
“High above the clot of trucks on Ottawa’s Parliament Hill, in hotel rooms just out of the fray, are the war rooms behind the operation,” run by “a team of self-appointed leaders, some with military and right-wing organizing backgrounds,” the Times reports. “On the ground,” captains oversee each occupied road and block, checking in “on the drivers ensconced in their cabs, delivering things like hot breakfasts — doling out so much food that some protesters said they have to turn it away.”
This all takes serious resources. Earlier in the three-week occupation, Sloly said a “significant” part of the funding was coming from the U.S. A hack of Christian crowdfunding site GiveGoSend on Sunday shows he was right: 56 percent of the 92,844 cataloged donors are American, according to an analysis of the leaked data by Canada’s Globe and Mail. 
On the other hand, about 52 percent of the nearly $9 million in documented donations came from Canada, versus 42 percent from the U.S., The Washington Post said. The largest single non-anonymous donation, $90,000, appears to have come from Silicon Valley billionaire Thomas Siebel. “Large donations were so significant that the top 1 percent of donors accounted for 20 per cent of all donations,” the Globe and Mail reports. “The top 10 per cent, meanwhile, accounted for nearly 50 percent of all donations. The Post broke down the U.S. donations by zip code.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau invoked the Emergencies Act on Monday to give law enforcement more tools to dismantle the occupation in Ottawa and at border crossings, and a key part of the strategy “is about following the money,” Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said Monday. “This is about stopping the financing of these illegal blockades.”
Canadian security analyst Jessica Davis told the CBC on Tuesday she doesn’t think freezing the accounts of protesters and organizers will immediately dissolve the Ottawa protest, but it could make life very difficult for them in the medium term.

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